Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition

Published: 20/12/2022 | Updated: 25/04/2023

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

That winter months frost is still around but your green thumb has begun to itch, you know what time it is, it's January! January's always a fresh start to a new, better year ahead, resolutions have just been made and gardens need to be planted. Whether you've started getting back on those gardening tasks or are still sobering up from your new year shenanigans and won't start heading out back until early February, we've created the ultimate January gardening guide to get you excited for some new garden beds and tender plants! Grab those garden tools and let's get started!

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January Garden Chores: To-Do List

All Climates

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

Northeast

In the Northeast, a January thaw is not unusual, giving you some time for yard work.

This is an excellent opportunity to evaluate how well your trees and shrubs are withstanding the sea spray if you live close to the beach. Next year, aim to replace underperforming plants with salt-tolerant ones.

Once the snow has fallen, clear the pathways to the garden of snow so you may more easily clear away fallen limbs and check for damage.

Midwest

In the Midwest, January is a chilly month. Your main responsibilities are garden maintenance and inspection. Continue looking for bark damage on trees and plants. If you do, you probably have a vole, rabbit, or deer problem and need to take action.

Once the snow has fallen, clear the garden access paths of snow. This improves your access to the winter garden, allowing you to remove fallen branches and check the health of your shrubs, among other things.

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

Pacific Northwest

In some places, the temperatures are probably acceptable enough for working outside on lovely days.

Pacific Coast

In Northern California, temperatures are probably tolerable enough that you can still work outside on days with decent weather. Gardeners in Southern California can be much more active.

Northern California:

Southern California:

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

Southwest

There will be times when you can't accomplish much outside in the high desert, but the low desert is more conducive to gardening and has a steady supply of water.

Southeast

Many people from the North would want to spend January in the Southeast. However, that does not imply that gardeners in the Southeast can relax their security measures. Hard freezes and abrupt temperature reductions do occasionally happen.

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

Florida

Florida is separated into North Florida, Central Florida, and South Florida to make it easier to forecast the weather. Despite the typically pleasant weather, if you live outside of South Florida (USDA zones 10 and 11), you still need to be prepared for temperature changes.

Sow Seeds Early

All different types of new seeds & young seedlings can be planted in early January. From flower seeds to bird seeds. Although tempting, there are a few issues you should be aware of. When you germinate seeds before temperatures warm you will need to make sure you have the right soil and location for the seed to grow in. The young plant must be outside for at least a few weeks which means you have to have enough room to keep the seedlings covered by your choice of plant coverings (we have an article all about this you can check out!). Make sure you protect tender plants as well if you're using nursery plants from your local garden center or garden catalogs.

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

Caring, Pruning, Planting & Sowing

Fruits

Planting:

General Care:

Pruning:

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

Vegetables

Planting:

General Care:

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

Problem Solvers

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

What to Plant in January?

There is no better time than the beginning of the year to plant a brand-new spring garden that will bring fresh vegetables and brilliant bulbs after a chilly winter. In milder climes, January is a fantastic time to start planting for outdoor gardens, although the coldest regions of the U.S. should wait until the last significant frosts have occurred. For planting in January, pick slow-growing perennials, cold-tolerant annuals, and landscaping shrubbery. Here are some of our favorites!

Amaryllis

The ideal splash of color for grey winters, potted amaryllis weathers the colder months wonderfully inside or in a greenhouse. Amaryllis bloom 5 to 8 weeks after planting, depending on your climate and the cultivar, so they do require some patience to flourish.

Beans & Peas

Snap, snow and English peas are hardy and can withstand the majority of freezing weather. Another excellent resilient alternative that can be planted in January is fava beans.

Greens

While lettuce, chard, and arugula can be planted all winter long, be sure to do your research on which greens are best for your region's environment.

Asparagus

Planting asparagus in early January will yield the finest results since it is in its prime in the early spring. Because asparagus roots are so delicate, keep the bed clear of weeds and sharp objects when digging.

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

Peonies

Peonies are often planted in late autumn, however, individuals who live in warmer climates with fewer severe touches of frost can do it in the winter.

Root Crops & Vegetables

Root vegetables that provide delicious winter soups include carrots, turnips, radishes, and parsnips. These can be planted as early as January and as late as the beginning of spring.

Hellebore

Hellebore is a vibrant, simple-to-grow perennial that blooms throughout the winter and looks amazing in bouquets. The colors range from mauve, scarlet, and even dark purple to green and white. They should be positioned as borders around shrubs and trees in rich, organic soil.

Narcissus

The paperwhite narcissus is a favorite among both gardeners and florists. They are another bloom that may be forced to bloom early by bringing it inside or placing it in a greenhouse over the winter. These can be planted in a container or grown in a bulb vase to display their roots.

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

Snowdrops

One of the hardiest flowers around snowdrops even starts to form buds while the ground is covered with snow. These tiny, fragile plants look attractive when planted in groups to create borders.

Daffodils

Do you want spring to arrive sooner? Another wonderful bulb to grow indoors is a daffodil, which can brighten up the dining room when the weather is dismal.

Kale

In milder climes, tougher kale cultivars like White Russian can be planted in January. However, they can also be sown as seedlings in a greenhouse and transplanted in early spring.

Everything You Need To Do: January Gardening Edition - Shrubhub

Potatoes

Potatoes can be planted in January if the soil can be worked. They are a fantastic crop for novices and need well-draining, loose soil and lots of sunlight. Because of their propensity to adapt to any situation or climate, potatoes can grow a successful harvest with little to no risk.

Look After Winter Bedding

Winter bedding can have a dead head similar to summer bedding for extending growth and extending blooms. Wintering bedding is important to ensure longer-lasting blooms and protection for your plant babies as well. Make sure your winter bedding has enough organic matter like mulch to protect it and fertilize it. The best time to check on soil nutrition is around late January after you've done all your garden chores. You might also want to reduce watering since the soil is less like to drain well in heavy snow.

It's Time to Check Things Off Your List!

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